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McGlinchey named in murder trial

December 28, 2011

By Staff Reporter

The son of Irish National liberation Army leader Dominic McGlinchey was the getaway driver in the Massereene barracks killings, a court has been told.

The claim was made by a barrister for Colin Duffy.

Duffy (44) from Lurgan in County Armagh, along with Brian Shivers (46) from Magherafelt in County Derry, is charged with murdering British soldiers Patrick Azimkar and Mark Quinsey at Massereene barracks in Antrim in March 2009.

The soldiers, who were due to leave for Afghanistan the next morning, were waiting outside the barracks for a pizza delivery when their killers struck.

Mr. Duffy’s barrister, Barry MacDonald QC, said police had “reliable information” and had questioned Dominic McGlinchey Jr. and his brother Declan McGlinchey about the attack on Massereene. Both were later released.

MacDonald said: “Police hold reliable information to indicate that a son of Dominic McGlinchey Sr. was the driver of the vehicle which was

subsequently recovered by police and was used in the fatal shooting of two soldiers.”

Dominic McGlinchey Sr., who had earned the sobriquet “Mad Dog,” was murdered in Drogheda, County Louth in 1994.

Earlier, Mr. Duffy’s wife, Martine, gave evidence at his trial.

She said her husband had not left the family house on the night of the attack on Massereene.

She said she remembered that day well, because the couple had been at a friend’s wedding the previous day.

Mrs. Duffy said she thought the attack was “absolutely terrible.”

She said she believed those responsible should be caught before adding: “it’s awful that my husband should be accused of it.”

In his summing up. prosecution barrister, Terence Mooney QC, said there could be no innocent explanation for the discovery of Mr. Duffy’s DNA on a latex glove tip found in the getaway car.

“It is illogical and nonsensical that, of all the items found in the car, the only one to be excluded from the attack is the tip of a latex glove,” he said.

“The latex glove, taking into account the implications from its presence in the car, is obviously linked to the attack.

“It was obviously present and had become detached from a glove worn by a terrorist who is trying to prevent traces of forensic material which could make a link between the terrorist and the car itself and the attack.”

The trial continues.

 

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